Honor Black History Month in Atlanta, Kansas City, and Memphis

February 17, 2020
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Every February, we honor the achievements of African Americans. Black History Month is an opportunity to recognize the vital role that this traditionally marginalized group has had in American history and culture. There are so many different ways to celebrate black history, no matter where you are. Here are a few things you can do to commemorate Black History Month in three of our favorite cities.

Courtesy of National Civil Rights Museum

The Origin of Black History Month

Before we jump into the celebration, let’s learn a little more about how Black History Month became such a time-honored tradition. The story begins in 1915, fifty years after the abolition of slavery and the passing of the Thirteenth Amendment. In September 1915, Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-educated historian, and Jesse E. Moorland, a well-known minister, founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (later known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History). This was an organization devoted to researching and advancing the achievements of black Americans.

In 1926, the ASALH decided to sponsor a national Negro History week. They chose the second week in February for their event to correspond with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. The weeklong celebration inspired communities around the country to organize local lectures, performances, and celebrations. By the 1960s, Negro History Week had evolved into Black History Month. In 1976, President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month, and it has been widely celebrated ever since.

Atlanta, GA

Kansas City, MO

Memphis, TN

Courtesy of Martin Luther King, Jr. National History Park
American Jazz Museum
Courtesy of American Jazz Museum Facebook Page
Courtesy of National Civil Rights Museum Facebook Page

No matter if you’re visiting Atlanta this February or any time of year, there are plenty of ways to honor African American history and culture. As your first stop, head to the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site. You can take a tour of King’s birth home, the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, and the King Center. At the King Center, visit the reflecting pool before viewing the exhibits on Dr. and Mrs. King, Rosa Parks, and Gandhi.

The APEX Museum bills itself as a museum “where every month is Black History Month.” APEX offers a view of American history from the African American perspective. Their “Sweet Auburn Street Pride” exhibit is a must-see; it provides a local history of the area and features a replica of one of Atlanta’s first African-American owned businesses.

The Center for Civil and Human Rights creates a link between the American Civil Rights Movement to our modern, global human rights movements. While every exhibit is worth checking out, you won’t want to skip “The Meaning of Hope: The Best of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection.” You can view some of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s personal papers and items that commemorate some of his most well-known works. 

If you’re going to be in Kansas City this month, there are so many ways you can honor the achievements of black Americans. Start by heading to the American Jazz Museum. The museum is located in the historic jazz district, where Count Basie, Charlie Parker, and countless other iconic musicians defined the genre in the ’20s, ’30s, and ’40s. Explore the interactive exhibits and learn all about the history of jazz.

Next, check out the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, a space dedicated to honoring the history of African American baseball and its impact on the country. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Negro National League (the US’s first successful black baseball league). Celebrate the centennial and check out all of the exhibits at the museum.

The National WWI Museum and Memorial is another must-see stop in Kansas City. The museum has a permanent exhibit that spotlights the African American men and women who served the country in any capacity. Spend some time reflecting at the memorial before touring all of the informative exhibits at the museum.

Memphis is a hub for African American culture and history. Celebrate Black History Month by first heading to the National Civil Rights Museum. It was built in the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, and the Young & Morrow and Boarding House buildings across the street. The museum is full of artifacts and exhibits that span five centuries of civil rights history, from the days of slavery to our modern age.

You’ll also want to stop at the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum. The museum was built in the historic Burkle Estate, one of the stops on the Underground Railroad that provided a safe place for runaway slaves to rest on their way to freedom. Here, you can journey through history and learn more about slavery and the Antebellum South.

No tour of black history in Memphis would be complete without celebrating the accomplishments of the city’s iconic black musicians and the songs that altered the music industry forever. The city is home to a number of museums and attractions dedicated to the work of B.B. King, Isaac Hayes, and other prominent musicians across genres who called Memphis home. Visit Sun Studio, the Memphis Music Hall of Fame, the Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum, and so many more.

These are just a few of our favorite attractions, but you can celebrate Black History  Month no matter where you happen to be. If you’re traveling this February, be sure to book with Frontdesk. We provide securely-managed rental suites in many major cities across the US. Browse our suites to begin planning your next trip today!

          

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